Tag Archives: privacy

Code Is Not Speech

code is speech

Brief version Advocates understand the idea that “code is speech” to create an impenetrable legal shield around anything built of programming code. When they do this they misunderstand, or misrepresent, free speech law (and rights law in general), which rarely creates such impenetrable shields, the principles that underlie that law, and the ways those principles […]

Posted in cyberlibertarianism, rhetoric of computation | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Responses

Crowdforcing: When What I “Share” Is Yours

a crowd

Among the many default, background, often unexamined assumptions of the digital revolution is that sharing is good. A major part of the digital revolution in rhetoric is to repurpose existing language in ways that advantage the promoters of one scheme or another. It is no surprise that while it may well have been the case […]

Posted in "social media", cyberlibertarianism, materality of computation, rhetoric of computation, what are computers for | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Responses

‘Is It Compromised?’ Is the Wrong Question about US Government Funding of Tor

cia dissemination of propaganda

In many ways, the most surprising thing about Yasha Levine’s powerful reporting on US government funding of Tor at Pando Daily has been the response to it. From the trolling attacks and ad hominem insults by apparently respectable, senior digital privacy activists and journalists, to repeated, climate-denialist-style “I’m rubber you’re glue”-type (or, as I like […]

Posted in cyberlibertarianism, privacy, revolution, rhetoric of computation, what are computers for | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Response